Lorikeet Studio

Lorikeet Studio
Lorikeet Studio

A modern studio apartment in an elevated position just a few minutes drive or a 15 – 20 minute stroll to Malenys main street. The studio is downstairs within the house, has its own access and looks on to our native garden, in a lovely peaceful area of Maleny. The studio is quite spacious and comfortably accommodates two people. It has an ensuite bathroom, a storeroom with hanging space and shelving and somewhere to store your bags.

Lorikeet Studio : Click here to BOOK and Check Availability

A modern studio apartment in an elevated position just a few mins drive or a 15-20 min stroll to Maleny’s main street. The studio is downstairs within the house, has its own access and is in a lovely peaceful area of Maleny.

The Space – accommodates two (2), has one (1) bathroom, (1) bedroom, (1) bed.  Check-in is at 2 pm and Check-out at 11 am.

Room type: Entire apartment.

 

 

An excerpt from Maleny’s sophisticated simplicity – Inspiring words by Benjamin Law and stunning photos by Anastasia Kariofyllidis  http://saltmagazine.com.au/articles/features/maleny-sunshine-coast-travel.aspx

DRIVING BETWEEN BRISBANE and the Sunshine Coast can be a tedious experience, but as I wind my car up steep hills towards Maleny, the view is an absolute joy.

When you’re steering alongside sheer cliff drops, you should probably keep your eyes on the road. But it’s hard not to take peeks at the scene unfolding right next to me: a vast panorama of valleys and diving hills, and lush scallops of forest.

For the last few days, this entire terrain has been bleak, grey and cold with rain. But today, it’s fecund and alive, and the sunshine makes it look as rich and saturated as an old technicolour movie.

When I finally park in Maple Street—Maleny’s main strip of bookshops (three in one street), butchers, draperies, antique stores, florists, nurseries, and organic grocers and restaurants – the mountain air is crisp like a sheet, with morning sunlight cutting through it all.

In my book, that’s perfect weather. After a long drive, I realise what I desperately need is food.

Even from my car, I smell fried eggs, squeezed juice, steaming hot coffee, black tea and toast. It’s an intoxicating welcome for a newcomer.

I perch myself at the Upfront Club, a co-operatively run music venue and restaurant-café, and one of Maleny’s most beloved institutions.

Like many Maleny eateries, the food offered here is eco-conscious. All the coffee and most of the tea is organic and so is the bread.

Inside, the Upfront Club is furnished with beautifully mismatched, saved-from-the-dump timber furniture.

Outside, it’s the perfect spot for people watching, and the locals here stroll past like a morning parade.

There are grandmothers with dreadlocks, young paint-stained artists, teenagers on scooters, women with ribbons in their hair, bricklayers downing lattés and muffins, old hippies in rude health and white collar office workers in ties who don’t look half as rushed as their city equivalents.

With his spectacles, beard and black cap, Danny Rose, 57, is a friendly, softly-spoken pirate of a man. He sips coffee with me, telling me how he’s been involved in the Upfront Club since its inception in the mid-90s.

Having been in Maleny since 1985, Danny now works as the music and events manager at the Upfront, and his love of the entire town is infectious.

It’s a shame, he says, that I’ve just missed out on the recent Maleny Wood Expo: the annual festival that showcases the furniture, toys and fittings made from the town’s most treasured timber, from red cedar to rainforest timber.

Paul Veit, 62, who sits on the board of directors of the Maple St Co-Op, joins us for a while.

Paul moved here with his partner ten years ago, from what he called “the big ugly city of Johannesburg” and initially discovered Maleny by accident.

Maleny
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